Culture Night: Eric O’ Neill on the streets of the Crescent (Top of O’Connell Street)

Our Georgian City

With fanlights above, and doors of distinction below.

These features of Georgian architecture obvious to those in the know.

With red brick facades, carrying the dust and grime of many a year.

Their golden proportions blinding to the thousands of visitors who stop and stare.

Limestone plinths glimmer in the rain soaked streets,

They hide the arched basements and coal bunkers under ones feet.

With sash windows of wood now numbering but just a few,

Ah sure as the planners say Plastic, sure it will do.

The railings of uniform and boundary, rusting and screaming out for care.

So much knowledge lost, a tapered point ,a cast finial or a forged spear.

The era of the Celtic Tiger grabbed and torn down.

Now we have time to think, to look, to frown!

With Cruises gone, and Arthur’s Quay just another modern disposable block,

Let’s gather our thoughts create an appreciation, of our valuable unique heritage stock.

Champions must step forward, brave enough to voice ,we as a society should care!

It’s a must for the unborn future generations, to ponder, embrace and share.

Conservation and best practice should be understood and become the norm,

Limericks Georgian City the winner, sheltered from neglect, poor vision and planning, which year on year causes more destruction than any storm.

– Eric O’ Neill

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The Street Line Critics Book Launch is here!

Hello Everyone,

The waiting is finally over!

We would like to invite you all to the launch of the Street Line Critics Book.  It will be an opportunity to meet those involved in the project and listen to some of the submissions to the project being read at the open mic.
It will be launched in the White House Bar in Limerick on the 8th of October at 8.30pm.
We look forward to seeing you there.

Clare Glynn Chitan outside Limerick’s Colbert Station

Limerick Junction

The Station large and dome like, clinically clean
Cream tiles with loneliness lingering in every pore
Birds flying high, coming home to roost, to nest under the eaves
Family’s grouped together, like midgets around the carriage doors
Filling in the silent moments with meaningless chit chat
Another youth his passage paid is leaving home
To wander the earth, to search for a living
A train huffed and puffed, while building up its steam
A whistle signals, the train is moving slowly, outward bound
A last look back, to little groups, disappearing in to the distance
A waving frenzy to the chug, chug, chug of the train
The engine singing
Going Away, Going Away, Going Away
And he is gone

– Clare Glynn Chitan 

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And we will be published!

Hello Everyone,

We have a very exciting announcement to make.

Limerick Arts Office is s providing us with funding towards the self-publishing of a book on the Street Line Critics Project. So a huge thank you to them for their support.  It is a huge encouragement and will help us bring the project further into the future.

We are already working hard on the design and would like to thank everyone who is helping to make it happen.  With a special thank you to  Dominic Taylor of the Limerick Writers Centre, who is helping us find our feet in the world of self publishing.

We are hoping to launch the book in September and we will be sure to invite you all as soon as we have set a date.

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Barry McHugh

The reason that Ormston House will always stick with me is because it was where I felt my year in limerick came together for me, for lack of a better word for it.

See most of the year I contemplated dropping out several times. Wondering whether I was going to take something away from doing the course. Intensified by the fact that a close friend of mine dropped out within a few weeks. Not to mention the fear that I was going to fail anyway. All this was magnified by personal issues while living in limerick. There were so many I never mentioned during that year.

Everything seemed to manifest in particular when I was presenting my work. I struggled more than I ever had with explaining my ideas. My confidence shot from this.

But when I did the talk in Ormston it was different. I funnily enough put up the wrong draft of my presentation instead of the one that I had decided to mechanically learn by heart. So I had to sort of let go and just adlib.

And in the end it worked. I felt such catharsis, like I had done a marathon.

– Barry McHugh

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